Archive for the ‘Social Policy’ Category

Most Popular Posts of 2018

Happy reading! Thank you to my loving readers for visiting my humble blog!

Reading opens you up to new ideas and worlds
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Guest Post: Better Angels – Let’s Depolarize America

Guest Post:

Better Angels – Slowly Bridging the Partisan Divide

This week of August 25, 2018, there’s been an outpouring of respect and love for the late Senator John McCain. It is good to see the nation once again remember that we are all Americans together.

 

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#SuicidePrevention – We Love You

You are sorely missed…

You matter more than you think…

There is always another way….

I guess you all know by now that the two celebrities, Kate Spade and Anthony Bourdain, took their own lives this past week.  Of course, these two celebrities were not in my social circle, but their deaths affected me. As a person and as a therapist, of course I understand that wealth and success don’t inoculate a person from suffering and suicidal thoughts. And, still….

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I finally turned around and saw dementia’s ugly, unwanted face

My mom passed away the summer of 2017.

I didn’t have the emotional stamina for writing about it

as we lived through it.

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May is Mental Health Awareness Month! Depression, Prevalence, Stigma

May is Mental Health Awareness Month!

As of 2017, the  World Health Organization lists depression as the top cause of ill health and disability worldwide.

 Just a few years ago, it was number four on the list.

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Sexual Assault and the Politics of Power

 

For centuries, survivors of sexual assault weren’t able to speak out.  The people in power in the dominant culture shamed victims of these violent acts  into silence and, perversely, even blamed them.

Today, women and other disenfranchised groups have gained access to stronger human, financial and political rights and are speaking out.  Over the past century, women acquired an array of legally binding equal rights.  Women having such legally acknowledged rights as voting,  property and credit rights shifted the balance of power in society. The stigma of higher education for women was also slowly lifted.  The first female Supreme Court judge, Sandra Day O’Connor, was appointed in 1984.  Currently, women hold influential positions in corporations and in politics. This shift in the balance of power gives women a larger voice and influenced society’s attitudes about sexual assault.  But even today, many are afraid to speak out. Only 19% of the 535 seats of the US Congress are held by women, while the women comprise 50.8% of the US population. Read the rest of this entry »

Highlights from the Postpartum Support International’s 2014 Annual Conference

I was so fortunate to be able to attend this year’s Postpartum Support International (PSI) 27th Annual Conference at the University of North Carolina (UNC) campus at Chapel Hill on June 18 – June 21, 2014!

Postpartum Support International Memorial Quilt

Postpartum Support International Memorial Quilt

This is PSI’s  Memorial Quilt, which has the names of women who lost their lives due to perinatal mental illness. The quilt is a traveling quilt and  requests by PSI members are considered for use at maternal mental health presentations and events.

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Reasons Behind Giving A Child Up For Adoption

Photo:Royalty-free/Ivette Ferrero

Photo:Royalty-free/Ivette Ferrero

Here’s a guest post from Helen Philips, who counsels birth mothers about the issues involved in giving a baby up for adoption. As she says, it;s easy to be judgmental, but we can’t know what it’s like to need to make such a profound decision, and it shouldn’t be taken lightly.

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Book Review: Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl by Harriet Jacobs

HarriettJacobsHarriet Jacobs lived a brutal and extraordinary life. Her story is appalling, sad, fascinating and inspiring all at once. Harriett’s life is all about the hardships of being a female piece of property. She writes intentionally in a women’s voice, highlighting gender issues. She hoped to appeal to free white women, to help them understand the abject cruelty of slavery and urgency of the abolitionist movement. Amy Post, an early feminist who attended the Seneca Falls Convention of 1848, encouraged to tell her story. Amy Post was a Quaker and an active abolitionist.

This book is a true gem of early feminism and historical significance. I found it for $3.50 at the bookstore at Fort Sumter, South Carolina. First published in 1861 under the pseudonym of Linda Brent, it’s one of the few personal accounts written by a woman born into slavery in the southern United States. There are hardly any first-person accounts from American slaves, as most didn’t read or write.

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Media, Motherhood and Mental Health: 2013 World Mental Health Day

Istock/PelageyaKlubnikina

Istock/PelageyaKlubnikina

It’s October 10, 2013 and I’m again honored to be participating in PsychCentral’s World Mental Health Blog Day.

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Kathy Morelli

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