Posts Tagged ‘women’s issues’

Myths About Infant Bonding and Attachment

Photo:Royalty-free/Ivette Ferrero

Being a new parent was one of the most confusing times in my life. Everything changes: the way that you feel about yourself, the way your marriage functions, and the way that you care for your child(ren) can turn your world upside down. To make it worse, everyone (loads of parenting experts, doctors, friends, relatives, etc.) believe that their advice will make your parenting experience easier.

Almost all of this parenting advice is well-intended, but more often than not you’ll hear confusing and contradictory claims about parenting that can make your job even more difficult than nature made it to begin with!

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Book Review: Dancing on the Edge of Sanity by Ana Clare Rouds

Dancing on the Edge of Sanity

asks once again

How Often Must We Ask for Sensitive Care?

 

It’s easy to connect with Ana Clare Rouds’ personal story of the reality of motherhood in her book, Dancing on the Edge of Sanity. She shares her personal story about her experience with postpartum depression, anxiety and obsessive-compulsive disorder, and she eloquently brings out several issues.

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Breast Cancer During Pregnancy

IStock/skynesher

IStock/skynesher

Pregnancy can be extremely demanding on its own. There are many things to learn about and keep track of, from nutrition to acceptable exercises. Despite this it should be regarded as a joyous occasion. Breast cancer is, of course, equally demanding and a very serious matter. It is important to understand the dangers specifically related to the scenario where these two meet, but also to remember that the joy of recovery and bringing a new life into the world are both down the road.

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Book Review: Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl by Harriet Jacobs

HarriettJacobsHarriet Jacobs lived a brutal and extraordinary life. Her story is appalling, sad, fascinating and inspiring all at once. Harriett’s life is all about the hardships of being a female piece of property. She writes intentionally in a women’s voice, highlighting gender issues. She hoped to appeal to free white women, to help them understand the abject cruelty of slavery and urgency of the abolitionist movement. Amy Post, an early feminist who attended the Seneca Falls Convention of 1848, encouraged to tell her story. Amy Post was a Quaker and an active abolitionist.

This book is a true gem of early feminism and historical significance. I found it for $3.50 at the bookstore at Fort Sumter, South Carolina. First published in 1861 under the pseudonym of Linda Brent, it’s one of the few personal accounts written by a woman born into slavery in the southern United States. There are hardly any first-person accounts from American slaves, as most didn’t read or write.

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Positive Mental Health: Heidi Koss: Yup, Its Me: the Face of Bipolar Disorder

Yup, It’s Me: The Face of Bipolar

Today I am humbled to share a guest post from Heidi Koss, LMHCA.

Many of you know Heidi Koss from her professional persona. She was  featured on this blog in April, 2013. She runs a busy psychotherapy practice in Washington state and is an activist in the area of Maternal Mental Health. She has volunteered for Postpartum Support International for sixteen years and is the Postpartum SUpport International Washington State Coordinator. Her passion for helping others is rooted in her own personal experiences with perinatal mood disorders. 

I invite you to read her moving personal story.

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August Blog Break – Planting Daffodils

This is a love letter to all of you hard-working women who fill so many various roles in your family and work life! I feel so connected to so many of you even if we haven’t met in person….

I’m posting a heart-felt “good-bye for now” love note from the BirthTouch® blog for the month of August. I’m taking some time and space to “plant daffodils” with my family to have many more years of sunshine blooms for the soul.  

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#PSIBlog Hop Guest Post: Cure for Cluelessness

Guest Post! PSI’s Valerie Rudiak!

Today I have the honor of hosting a story that looks at postpartum depression from a different angle; the angle of a friend looking in. Read Valerie Rudiak’s story about her relationships around the time of her wedding and what the cure for cluelessness is! Please join me in welcoming Valerie’s contribution to the Postpartum Support International’s 2013 Blog Hop! Speak Up When You’re Down!

The Clinically Proven Treatment for Cluelessness

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New Jersey: Part Two: Women’s Reproductive Health Events

Spring was a great time for Women’s Reproductive Health events in New Jersey. I was fortunate enough to attend and also was invited to Strengthen Our Mothers-41287-finalpresent at La Leche League of the Garden State’s Annual Conference in Jamestown, New Jersey. I also went to an event hosted by St. Clare’s Hospital and the Partnership for Maternal and Child Health of Northern New Jersey.

I had so much fun meeting and seeing some virtual colleagues/friends, such as Ruth Callahan and Colleen White at LLL and Ivy Shih Leung and Irina Polanco-Ventura at St. Clare’s, and of course meeting new ones! Apparently, St. Clare’s has a kick-ass postpartum depression group. I was so glad to get pointers on getting my group in Wayne, NJ going to be as kick-ass as that one!

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Pec Indman – Postpartum Support Int 2013 Conference

Behind the Scenes

Spotlight: Pec Indman, EdD,MFT

Bio: Dr. Pec Indman is a internationally recognized expert in the field of mental peclookrighthealth related to pregnancy and postpartum. In 2002, she was one of the first professionals, along with Dr. Shoshona Bennett, to author a book about postpartum depression. In her private psychotherapy practice, she works with clients experiencing fertility challenges, pregnancy loss, depression and anxiety during pregnancy or postpartum. Dr. Indman is the Chairperson of the Education and Training Committee of Postpartum Support International and speaks all over the world. As an invited participant, she contributes to several federally funded programs on the topic of pregnancy and postpartum mood disorders.

Interview: It is my honor to introduce to you to one of the wise women of the perinatal mental health world, Pec Indman.

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Stigma Around Mental Illness Causes People to Not Get the Treatment They Need

Stigma and Fear Around Perinatal Mental Illness

With help, you can get better! Istock/Elana Vizerskaya

With help, you can get better! Istock/Elana Vizerskaya

The mentally ill are dealing with public and self-shame. Research consistently shows that we stereotype people with mental illness as someone low-functioning, someone who can’t hold a job (Corrigan et al, 2010). Feelings of uneasiness and fear, rather than feelings of compassion bubble up (Corrigan et al, 2010). Think about your own reactions to the words “mental illness.”

Be aware that a mother who is feeling depressed, anxious or fearful is probably experiencing deep self-shame. She probably feels more shame than is expected and associated with a physical illness. She probably has her own erroneous beliefs about the nature of mental illness.

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